An essay on american government after the revolutionary war and the bill of rights

Visit Website Did you know? Now most famous as a traitor to the American cause, General Benedict Arnold began the Revolutionary War as one of its earliest heroes, helping lead rebel forces in the capture of Fort Ticonderoga in May This First Continental Congress did not go so far as to demand independence from Britain, but it denounced taxation without representation, as well as the maintenance of the British army in the colonies without their consent, and issued a declaration of the rights due every citizen, including life, liberty, property, assembly and trial by jury. The Continental Congress voted to meet again in May to consider further action, but by that time violence had already broken out.

An essay on american government after the revolutionary war and the bill of rights

Thirty years after a war that wounded its heart, 20 years after a scandal that scarred its conscience, 10 years after fiscal policies that ridiculed its sense of responsibility and fairness, the country has nearly exhausted the qualities by which democracy survives and flourished.

As Americans we have come to act more oppressed by freedom than invigorated by it, more concerned with freedom from rather than freedom to. We divide between the vast majority of us who -- out of futility, confusion or indifference -- are so disengaged from democracy we never vote at all, and those of us who vote not to thoughtfully resolve complicated issues but to express our rage.

History is clear that democracy cannot long navigate a sea of national rage. Untempered by rationale and open-mindedness, fury eventually consumes democracy rather than nourishes it, because it overwhelms our tolerance, our willingness to be reasonably informed, our determination to hold ourselves accountable for what we decide.

Most important, it overwhelms our basic faith in democracy itself and our belief in the individual freedoms that are inviolate to the power of the majority, identified by the Declaration of Independence as endowed by God and codified in the first 10 amendments to the Constitution.

We display less patience, in other words, with other Americans. A deep freeze has settled in the American soul. The nation gets meaner and more petty until rage is the only national passion left -- and then it is anger not at those on top, which is the anger America was born of, but at those on the bottom.

Increasingly, we view individual freedom not as the fundamental building block of collective freedom but as an affront to collective sensibility or security. We are encouraged by talk-show commentators to regard the most basic precepts of democracy as sentimental luxuries at best or, at worst, as legalistic refuge for vicious criminals, social parasites and moral scum.

We find indignant solace in the single greatest myth of the contemporary political landscape, which holds that the problem with the country is the government and the politicians and the process as a whole.

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This myth, that the process has grown helplessly out of touch with what we really want and feel and need, is the opposite of the truth. The truth is that we are the problem with America. Confronted with change that is truly profound or revolutionary, which is to say unavoidably painful and disorienting, we scurry back to the status quo that so infuriated us to begin with, and that not so long ago we claimed was unacceptable.

When they speak of unpleasant realities and tell us things must necessarily get harder before they get easier -- Bob Dole on the subject of the deficit and Bruce Babbitt on taxes during the presidential campaign ofPaul Tsongas on the economy inWarren Rudman and Bob Kerrey on entitlements, William J.

An essay on american government after the revolutionary war and the bill of rights

Bennett and Jack Kemp on illegal immigration -- we dismiss them at the polls or denounce them from the streets. From political season to political season we demand our problems be solved and then make ruthlessly clear we expect someone else to pay the price. We say we want government to be smaller, but we never name government programs directly affecting us that we would be willing to forgo.

An essay on american government after the revolutionary war and the bill of rights

People in the cities cry for cutting farm subsidies, people in the suburbs call for cutting inner-city programs. To suggest we are hypocrites sounds elitist. It subverts the populism on which both the Right and Left capitalize, and offends the professed egalitarianism of a news media already cowed by accusations of liberal bias.

Our common sense admits that national economic survival is not served by cutting taxes and is not possible without addressing the epic components that make up most of the national budget, which one segment or another of the public has declared sacrosanct: That is because we have secretly come to fear and resent that the American dream itself may be a delusion.

This is the source of our rage, and of the rage that would devour democracy. It is a rage at ourselves, which we can barely stand to live with but which is the only thing that seems to pump blood through the national heart anymore.

It is a rage at contradictions that confound and beset us. Though America has won the Cold War, we grow spiritually lethargic: International triumph appears not to have so much consolidated our power as dissipated it, and perhaps revealed its uselessness.

Though the economy improves, we grow financially insecure: Though the crime rate has dropped, we grow physically vulnerable:Revolutionary War Quotes. We have lots of great Revolutionary War Quotes for you from the time of the American Revolution and Beyond! You might think quotes from America's Founding Fathers would be rather dry and uninteresting but you would be wrong!

- The Bill of Rights During the Revolutionary War the rebelling colonies needed to find a way to govern the new nation and created the Articles of Confederation. - Bill of Rights Essay “ The government is morally obligated to serve people and protect their rights such as life, liberty, and property.

- The Bill of Rights is a very. The Revolutionary War erupted on April 19, (60). The reason the British and the Americans resorted to using arms after a decade of fighting verbally and ideologically over the rights of the British subjects in the colonies, was because both sides had finally "become convinced that force alone could decide the issues that divided the empire.

Although James Madison was the youngest member of the Continental Congress, his leadership was a critical factor in the development of American government.

Madison proposed the Virginia Plan, he authored some of the Federalist Papers, and he wrote the Bill of Rights. The first national election. The Bill of Rights in the United States is the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution.

Proposed following the often bitter –88 debate over ratification of the U.S. Constitution, and written to address the objections raised by Anti-Federalists, the Bill of Rights amendments add to the Constitution specific guarantees of personal freedoms and rights, clear limitations on.

Included: revolutionary war essay content. Preview text: The American Revolution is a historical event that provokes the true spirit of nationalism in many Americans.

and the English Bill of Rights. The former Americans did build a new administration later than the American War for Independence and only in that manner; the earlier.

Revolutionary War Quotes from the Founding Fathers and Founding Era