An overview of the circadian rhythms and the biological clock concept in medical doctrine

Studies have found that these changes are governed by a biological clock, which in mammals is located in two brain areas called the suprachiasmatic nuclei. The circadian cycles established by this clock occur throughout nature and have a period of approximately 24 hours. In addition, these circadian cycles can be synchronized to external time signals but also can persist in the absence of such signals. Studies have found that the internal clock consists of an array of genes and the protein products they encode, which regulate various physiological processes throughout the body.

An overview of the circadian rhythms and the biological clock concept in medical doctrine

These clocks are responsible for our circadian rhythms, the roughly hour cycles of physical, mental and behavioral changes that influence sleep patterns, hormone release, body temperature, hunger and more.

Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health are identifying the genes and proteins that run biological clocks and figuring out exactly how they help keep daily rhythms in synch. This knowledge could aid the development of remedies for a range of clock-related disorders, from insomnia and jet lag to diabetes.

Sugar Production Scientists have long suspected that diabetes, obesity and other metabolic disorders could be linked to problems with biological clocks, and new scientific findings support this.

An overview of the circadian rhythms and the biological clock concept in medical doctrine

The scientists believe that KL could be developed into a drug and offer a new approach for treating conditions associated with abnormal blood sugar levels, like diabetes. Better Sleep Fruit flies exhibit sleep patterns fairly similar to our own.

Sleep-related disorders affect up to 70 million adults in the United States, and insufficient sleep is linked to an increased risk for chronic diseases like high blood pressure, diabetes, depression and cancer. To better understand slumber, scientists have been searching for its genetic basis.

After many attempts to find genes dedicated to controlling sleep, Rockefeller University researchers have uncovered two, called Rca1 and CycA, that appear essential to proper sleep in fruit flies, a well-established organism for studying genetics that actually has sleep patterns fairly similar to our own.

Many other organisms, including humans, have genes that operate just like Rca1 and CycA. The researchers believe that, by better understanding how these genes work in fruit flies, they will gain insight into how our genes control sleep.

Scientists from the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the University of Washington learned this by exposing hamsters—another organism used in sleep research—to conditions that advanced or delayed the biological clock.

Travelers experience similar circadian advances flying west to east, when they lose time, and delays upon their return, when they gain time. A better molecular understanding of this phenomenon might aid the development of more effective jet lag remedies.

Channeling Patterns of Behavior Expression of the Ir potassium channel gene green peaks at dusk in pacemaker neurons in the fruit fly brain. Justin Blau, New York University. By figuring out how biological clocks drive sleep and wake cycles, scientists might be able to identify new molecular targets for drugs that treat sleep-related disorders.

By focusing on a clock gene that makes a potassium channel in fruit flies, scientists from New York University discovered that the gene is much more active at dusk than dawn in one biological clock: When the researchers reduced expression of the gene—and, in turn, the production of the channel protein and its electrical activity—the flies displayed dawn-like behavior at dusk.

And when the scientists increased gene expression, most flies lost behavioral rhythms. Because fruit fly and human clock genes function similarly, researchers expect that potassium channels may play a role in driving our circadian patterns of behavior.

Seasonal Calendar Findings made by studying a simple plant might shed light on the mechanisms of seasonal affective disorder in humans. Takato Imaizumi, University of Washington. Many organisms use their biological clocks to measure changes in the season. This process is especially important for plants, including the ones we harvest, because it keeps them from flowering in the dead of winter.

Every day in the late afternoon, plant cells express a light-activated protein called FKF1, which then turns on flowering mechanisms.Overview of Circadian Rhythms Martha Hotz Vitaterna, Ph.D., Joseph S. Takahashi, Ph.D., and Fred W.

Turek, Ph.D. The daily light-dark cycle governs rhythmic . Apr 14,  · Introducing the epigenetic clock hypothesis reports “Animals and plants have biological clocks that help to regulate circadian cycles, seasonal rhythms, growth, development, and sexual maturity.

It is reasonable to suspect that the timing of senescence is also influenced by one or more biological clocks.

Overview of circadian rhythms — Northwestern Scholars

The Circadian Rhythm is a hour biological wake – sleep cycle that governs most animals and humans in a synchronized series of natural functions and responses. You are set to respond to the circadian rhythm based on an inner biological clock. Overview of Circadian Rhythms Martha Hotz Vitaterna, Ph.D., Joseph S.

Takahashi, Ph.D., and Fred W. Turek, Ph.D. The daily light-dark cycle governs rhythmic changes in the behavior and/or physiology of most. ou've gone to sleep without remembering to set your alarm clock.

Yet somehow you still manage to wake up at your usual 7 a.m. Luck? Perhaps, but more likely, your circadian rhythms were responsible for getting you up on time.

Scientists from the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the University of Washington learned this by exposing hamsters—another organism used in sleep research—to conditions that advanced or delayed the biological clock.

circadian rhythm